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Church of England Churches

Listed left are Districts/Parish Churches within the City of Birmingham boundary. Clicking on the District will take you to the District Information Page which also shows an approximate Ordnance Survey Grid Reference. Where Birmingham has been indicated this means Birmingham Central. All sources are from Birmingham Central Library archives, Birmingham Diocesan Directory and the Victorian History of the Counties of England. Warwickshire Vol.VII

Unless identified separately & specifically ALL Churches are C of E

C of E

Birmingham - Chapel of St Mary (Chapel) Formerly in Whittall Street / St Mary’s Row ( O.S. GR SP 071875 approx)

Built in 1774 under the Act of 1772 as a chapel of ease to St Martin’s. Birmingham. A parish was formed out of St Martin’s was assigned to St Mary’s in 1841. Under an act of 1925 the church was closed pending demolition and the benefice and the parish were united to those of Bishop Ryder’s Church. St Mary’s was a small parish about a quarter of a mile square in the gun making quarter of the town. A mission hall in Whittall Street was licensed for public worship from 1888 to 1907, and the chapel of the General Hospital from 1921 ( it was licensed in the parish of Bishop Ryder from 1925 )


Neighbouring parishes

Aston, Bishop Ryder, Ashtead, St Bartholomew, St Peter, St Philip, St Paul, St George

Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department

Baptisms 1774 - 1925

Marriages 1842 – 1925

1941 - 1970

Burials 1779- 1884  

Banns 1895 – 1924

Churching 1793 – 1840

Lease of burial ground to the City Council 1881

Agreement for demolition of church and removal of human remains  927 (MS 1369 )

B.M.S.G.H.- Register Copies

CD – Rom – D025 Greater Birmingham Miscellany (includes other churches) Baptisms 1774 -1812  

Fiche – M053 Baptisms 1744 - 1812 (includes St Paul Aston, St John Deritend)  

Bishops transcripts at Lichfield

Baptisms 1774 - 1847

Burials 1774 - 1847


C of E

Birmingham - Christ Church Formerly Victoria Square / Colmore Row / New Street / Ann Street ( O S GR. SP 067868 )

Built by public subscription in 1805 and consecrated in 1813. A parish was assigned in 1865 from St Martin’s, Birmingham and St Philip’s, Birmingham. The building and site were sold in 1897 and the proceeds of the sale used to build St Agatha’s, Sparkbrook. The church was demolished in 1899 and the parish merged with St Philip’s, Birmingham. A mission in Fleet Street was licensed for several years up to 1890 and one in Pinfold Street was licensed from 1886.


Neighbouring parishes

St Philip, St Martin, St Thomas, St Paul


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department

Baptisms 1865 – 1897

Marriages 1865 – 1897

Burials 1817 - 1898

Catacombs 1817 - 1888

Bishop’s Transcripts at Lichfield

Baptisms 1817 – 1831


C of E

Birmingham - Immanuel Broad Street (O.S.GR. SP 0686 )

Originated as a chapel licensed by the bishop and known as Magdeline Chapel, which was opened in 1839. The new church of Immanuel on the same site was consecrated in 1865, and a parish was assigned out of St Thomas’s, Birmingham. In 1939 the parish and in 1946 the benefice were united with those of St Thomas, Birmingham , the united benefice being known as St Thomas and Immanuel.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department

Baptisms 1865 – 1939

Marriages 1865 – 1937

Private baptisms 1867 - 1932


C of E

Birmingham - St Asaph Great Colmore Street / Latimer Street (O.S. GR.SP 0685 approx )

Consecrated in 1868. A parish was assigned out of St Thomas, Birmingham in 1860. The church was closed in 1949 and put in the charge of the vicar of St Lukes, Birmingham

Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department

Baptisms 1869-1949 including St Thomas

Marriages 1869-1958

Vestry minutes 1921 - 1947

P C C minutes 1920 - 1949


C of E

Birmingham - St Bartholomew Formerly in Masshouse Lane ( O.S. GR. SP 076879 approx )

Built in 1749 as a chapel of ease to St Martin’s, Birmingham. In 1847 St Bartholomews became a parish church, a parish being assigned out of St Martin’s, parish. In 1937 the church was closed, and in 1939 the benefice was united with that of Bishop Ryder’s Church to form a new united benefice. The parish was split into four parts which were added to the parishes of St Philip, St Gabriel, which had been formed out of St Bartholomew’s in 1869, St Martin and Bishop Ryder. St Bartholomew’s had no mission room or chapel.

Neighbouring parishes

Bishop Ryder, Ashtead, Aston, St Martin, St Peter, St Philip, St Mary


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department

Baptisms 1847-1929

Marriages 1847-1937

Burials 1847-1899


C of E

Birmingham - St Jude Hill Street (O.S. GR. SP 069868 )

A parish has been assigned out of St Martin’s, Birmingham and St Philip’s, Birmingham in 1845. Services were held in the national school in Pinfold Street until the church was ready. It was consecrated in 1851. The parish was enlarged by a further part of St Martin’s in 1885. St Judes Mission Hall, Inge Street, was licensed for public worship 1888 –1907.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department

Baptisms 1846-1968

Marriages 1851-1955


C of E

Birmingham -St Martin Edgbaston Street / Moat Lane / The Bull Ring ( O.S. GR SP 075866 )

Ancient Parish

During the rebuilding of St Martin, Birmingham in the 19th century evidence was found of a 12th century building on the site. There was no mention of a church in the Domesday Book and the earliest mention of a church was inn 1263. The benefice has always been a rectory. The parish of St Philips to which a further portion was added in 1900, was formed out of that of St Martin in 1708. In 1830 the ancient parish of St Martin was divided into two distinct and separate parishes, St Martin and St George’s. St Martin was again divided in 1834, into St Martin’s St Thomas’s, and All Saints. Since then parishes or parts of parishes have been assigned out of St Martin’s to the churches of Bishop Ryder 1841, St Mary 1841, St Paul 1841, St Luke 1843, St Mark 1843, St Jude 1845, St Bartholomew 1847 (Part reunited with St Martin 1939) St John, Ladywood 1854, St Barnabas 1861, Christ Church 1865, and St Gabriel 1869. Small parts of St Martin’s parish were later added to the parishes of St Jude 1845, St Philip 1900, St Paul 1900,. In 1939 part of the parish of St Bartholomew was reunited with St Martins. A mission hall in Dean Street was licensed for public worship from 1908 to 1926. A mission church at 32 Newhall Street was mentioned in 1858.


Neighbouring parishes

St Bartholomew, Aston, Deritend, St Thomas, Christ Church, St Philip, St Peter


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department

Baptisms 1555-1929

Marriages 1554-1981

Burials 1554 -1915 also 1766 entries for St Mary’s Chapel Whittall Street  


Burial ground Park Street Removal off remains & headstones as consequence of Railway extension 1894.  From St Martins to burial ground Bull Street Removal of remains 1880

B.M.S.G.H.- Register Copies

C D - D025 Greater Birmingham Miscellany includes other churches. bapt. 1554 –1708 marr 1653 -1707 bur 1553 – 1704  

Fiche - M042 -Part 1 - bapt. 1555-1653. mar. 1554-1641. bur 1554-1630,

Fiche – M043 -Part 2 – bapt. 1653-1708. marr. 1653-1706. bur. 1653-1704

DVD /CD - Digital scans of the original registers spanning 1544 – to early 1900’s

Warwick Record Office

Printed register 1555 -1653

Printed register Vol 2

Baptisms 1653-1708

Marriages 1653-1706

Burials 1653-1704

Bishop’s Transcripts at Lichfield

1662 –1831 (substantial gaps)


C of E

Birmingham ( Dale End ) - St Peter (O.S. GR. SP 0787 approx )

Consecrated in 1827. It was gutted by fire in 1831 and restored by 1837. A parish was assigned out of St Phillip’s, Birmingham in1847. The church was closed for demolition in 1899, the endowments transferred to St Peter’s Birmingham ( Spring Hill / George Street West ) and the parish merged with that of St Philip, Birmingham.


Neighbouring parishes

St Mary, St Bartholomew, St Martin, Christ Church, St Philip


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department

Baptisms 1842 –1898

Marriages 1847 - 1898


C of E

Birmingham - St Philip's Cathedral Colmore Row / St Philips Square (O.S. GR SP 072877)

The church of St Philip Birmingham which is now the cathedral church., was built between 1711 and 1725 under an act of 1708, and consecrated in 1715. The act of 1708 provided for the formation of a parish of St Philip to be taken out of St Martin’s The advowson belonged to the Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry until 1836, when it was transferred to the Bishop of Worcester. It was again transferred in 1905 to the Bishop of Birmingham. The area of the parish has undergone several changes since 1708: part of the parish of St Jude, Birmingham was assigned out of St Philip’s in 1845; the parish of St Peter’s, Birmingham and part of the parish of Christ church, Birmingham, were formed out of St Philip’s in 1847 and 1865, and were again merged with St Philip’s in 1899 and 1897 respectively; part of what had been Christ Church parish was transferred to St Barnabas, Birmingham in 1901; parts of St Martin’s and St Bartholomew’s, Birmingham were added to St Philip’s in 1900 and 1939 respectively. St Philip’s has been the cathedral church of the diocese in 1905. Unlike most of the other central churches, St Philip’s did not need to establish licensed mission rooms at the end of the 19th century. The only places in the parish licensed for public worship have been the Birmingham and Midland Eye Hospital 1909 and the Townsend Club in Church Street 1948.


Neighbouring parishes

St Mary, St Bartholomew, St Peter, St Martin, Christ Church, St Paul


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives

Baptisms 1715 - 1863 (Some records have been withdrawn)

Marriages 1715 - 1960  

Burials 1715 - 1965  

BMGSH register copies

C D - Rom - D025 - marriages.

(Greater Birmingham Miscellany includes other churches) 1715 - 1800

CD - Rom – D020 – baptisms 1715 – 1812 finding aid only includes surname and forename

Fiche – M014 – marriages 1715 - 1800

Bishop’s Transcripts at Lichfield

1715 - 1832


C of E

Birmingham - St Simons Mission Heaton Street (with All Saints Birmingham )

Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department

Registers of Mission and Other subsidiary churches 1910 - 1921


C of E

Birmingham - St Thomas ( later St Thomas & Immanuel ) Bath Row / Holloway Head (O.S. GR. SP 064862 )

The church was consecrated in 1829. A parish was assigned out of St Martin’s, Birmingham in 1834; parts of it were taken to form the parishes of Immanuel, Birmingham 1865, and St Asaph, Birmingham 1869.  The church was consecrated in 1829. A parish was assigned out of St Martin’s, Birmingham in 1834; parts of it were taken to form the parishes of Immanuel, Birmingham 1865, and St Asaph, Birmingham 1869. The church which as refitted in 1893 was largely destroyed by enemy action in 1940. In 1946 the benefice was joined with that of Immanuel, Birmingham to form the united benefice of St Thomas and Immanuel, part of the endowment being transferred to St Mathew’s, Perry Beeches. The two parishes were merged in 1939.A mission room in Ellis Street was licensed for public worship from 1908 to 1926 the chapel of The Accident Hospital (formerly Queen’s Hospital ) has been licensed since 1908 and the Church Army Hostel, Granville Street 1958.


Neighbouring parishes

St Martin, Deritend, Bordesley, Christ Church


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department

Baptisms 1948-1961

Marriages 1935 -1961, Dec 1940 -Apl 1941, Jun 1941 – Apl 1942 (entered in the register of the parish of St Asaph Birmingham)

Banns 1942 -1961


C of E

Birmingham - St Thomas & Immanuel Broad Street ( O. S. GR SP 0685 approx )

Is a united benefice in the gift of the trustees of St Martin’s, Birmingham formed in 1946 from St Thomas’s, Birmingham and Immanuel, Birmingham

Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department

Baptisms 1829 - 1948

Marriages 1835 - 1941

Burials 1830 - 1908


Non Conformist


Apostolic Faith Church Baptist - Broad Street Birmingham

Meeting rooms were registered for public worship from 1919 to 1925.


Baptist - Alcester Street Birmingham

St Martin’s chapel see Warwick Street Nechells.


Baptist - Bradford Street Digbeth Circus

Chapel formerly Ryan’s Amphitheatre was converted in 1884. In 1851 the chapel, was said to be closely connected with Heneage Street Aston Missions from which the Pershore Road Selly Park and Gooch Street Highgate churches derive were founded from Bradford Street Digbeth in 1867 and 1882 respectively. Members were largely responsible for the opening of the Wycliffe Church,


Baptist - Cannon Street Birmingham

The mother church of Birmingham Baptists was founded in 1737 by local baptists who had previously formed part of a church at Bromsgrove Worcestershire. There is said to have been a Baptist meeting in Birmingham from the beginning of the 18th century. In 1738 the congregation built their first chapel. In a Cherry Orchard, Cannon Street Birmingham. The chapel was twice enlarged 1763,and 1780. In 1806 the old building was completely replaced. Due to town improvements in 1879 the chapel closed and the congregation moved to Mount Zion Chapel Graham Street Birmingham in 1880. Branch chapels founded from Cannon Street Birmingham include Bond Street Hockley 1786, Zion, Newhall Street Birmingham 1814, Wythall Heath 1806, and Shirley Street 1845 both preaching stations as early as 1798 Alvechurch 1828, and Kings Norton 1847. From 1837 there was a branch preaching room in Hill Street Birmingham. The Cannon Street Memorial Church Soho Handsworth opened in 1930.The Old Cannon Street Birmingham congregation occupied the vacated chapel and continued there until 1913 when the chapel was closed commemorates the old central chapel. It was later demolished.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptisms 1785-1856 Burials – deaths 1790-1854


Baptist - Charlotte Street Birmingham

Chapel appears in Birmingham directories from 1875 to 1882.


Baptist - Freeman Street Birmingham

Meeting was in existence in 1729 when a congregation of General or Arminian Baptists registered for public worship. The church is said to have dissolved in 1754 its members joining the Cannon Street Birmingham congregation of Particular Baptists.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptisms 1786 - 1837


Baptist - Latimer Street Birmingham

Chapel appears in Birmingham directories as a Baptist Chapel from 1873 to 1884 from which date is entered as Wesleyan.


Baptist - Lombard Street Birmingham

Chapel was built in 1785 and repaired and enlarged in 1807. Lombard Street was the first chapel of the general Baptist New connexion to be opened in Birmingham, after the congregation had met for twelve years in hired rooms in Park Street Birmingham and Needless Alley Birmingham. Until 1800 the Birmingham meeting formed part of a joint church, with one branch at Sutton Coldfield .In 1889 a new chapel in Moseley Road Highgate was opened for the Lombard Street Birmingham church and the old chapel was said to be closed, but in 1892 a small congregation was still meeting in the old premises. Lombard Street Birmingham members at High Street Kings Heath 1816, and Longmore Street Highgate1866 opened daughter chapels.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptisms 1786 - 1837


Baptist - Newhall Street Birmingham

Zion Chapel was first used by Baptists as early as 1805 when a congregation allegedly of “antinomians” began worshiping in vacant meeting house, originally built in 1791 for the Swedenborgians and first registered as Zion Chapel in 1803. By 1814 this congregation appears to have dissolved and in the year a Particular Baptist Church was formed at Zion by Cannon Street Birmingham. In the census return of 1851 Zion Chapel Newhall Street Birmingham is said to date from 1814.. In 1904 the chapel was closed, while minister of Zion Chapel to brought into union with it’s congregation that of the Congregationalist chapel in Livery Street Birmingham. Members of the Zion Church were responsible for the opening Zion 1848 of Great King Street Hockley Peoples Chapel.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptisms 1821 – 1837


Baptist - Warwick Street Digbeth

Peoples Chapel was completed in 1878. It originated in work carried on from 1865 in Warwick Street .In 1913 the old chapel was abandoned for St Martin’s chapel Alcester Street Birmingham.


Baptist - Wynn Street Birmingham

Mission was opened in 1882., and was carried on by members of Bradford Street Digbeth Circus Chapel. The mission moved eventually to Gooch Street Highgate Tabernacle.


Baptists – Strict Baptists - Summer Row Birmingham

Mission room was registered for public worship in 1906 by seceders from Frederick Street Hockley. It was closed after a few years, the members rejoining Frederick Street Hockley and registration was cancelled in 1925.


Baptists – Welsh Baptists - John Bright Street Birmingham

A meeting room was registered for public worship in 1928, is the latest meeting place of the Birmingham Welsh Baptists, affiliated to the Denbigh, Flint and Marioneth Baptist Association. The Birmingham Welsh Church was first received into the Midland Baptist Association in 1854 and in the following year the congregation had a place of worship through no regular pastor, in Bell Barn Road Five Ways This was formerly a Wesleyan Chapel and was bought in 1853. In 1890 the regular meeting room was at the offices of the West Midland Baptist Association in Colmore Row, Birmingham where in 1892 there was a Sunday evening congregation. Shortly after this the Masonic Hall (and former synagogue) Severn Street, Birmingham was used for a time.


Brethren - Anderton Street

A Brethren’s meeting from 1934 used Birmingham chapel formerly belonging to the Churches of Christ. It was closed in 1944 through lack of support and sold.


Brethren - Ann Street Birmingham ( later Colemore Row Birmingham)

School was in use for a Brethren’s meeting in 1851.


Brethren - Broad Street Birmingham

Gospel room was registered for public worship from 1909 – 1925. From 1912 to 1925 a “bible institute” was also registered, in rooms in the Stratford Hall, St Peter’s.


Brethren - Great Charles Street Birmingham

Central Hall was registered for public worship in 1867. Registration for public worship ceased in 1925, but the hall appears to have closed before 1921.


Brethren - Ruston Street Birmingham

Gospel hall was registered for public worship in 1867. It was mentioned in 1954 but was not included in the Brethren’s meetings in 1957.


Brethren - Waterloo Street Birmingham

Chapel so described in 1850 appears to have been the first permanent Brethren’s meeting place in Birmingham. It was registered at the Worcester Diocesan Registry in 1843, when it was described as a “room”. The chapel made no return to the religious census of 1851, and it seems likely that in that year the congregation had moved to Ann Street, nearby.


Brethren - Wood Street Bath Row Five Ways

Meeting was registered for public worship from 1867 to 1906


Catholic Apostolic Church - Newhall Street Birmingham

Chapel was built as a Presbyterian church and was used by the Presbyterians until 1834 when it appears to have been acquired by the Catholic Apostolic Church. In 1849 it was called the Unknown Tongue Chapel and was described as a “small plain building”. The chapel was replaced in 1873 by Summer Hill Church, and the site was in 1893, occupied by the Birmingham Assay office.


Catholic Apostolic Church - Summer Hill Birmingham

Church was completed in 1873.


Christadelphians - Ann Street Birmingham ( later Colemore Row Birmingham )

School was the first meeting place of the Christadelphians, and was used by then from 1864 to 1866, when it was replaced by Athenaeum hall Temple Row Birmingham.


Christadelphians - Easy Row Birmingham

Meeting room was registered for public worship from 1900 to 1911 and was used for the weekday-evening meetings of the New Street Birmingham Masonic Hall ecclesia.


Christadelphians - John Bright Street Birmingham

Ecclesia withdrew from fellowship with the Birmingham ( Temperance Hall ) ecclesia in 1919. A separate ecclesia it continued to meet in hired premises, and in 1956 was using the Shakespeare Rooms, Edmund Street Birmingham.


Christadelphians - Lincoln Inn Corporation Street Birmingham

Meeting was registered for public worship from 1887 to 1906.


Christadelphians - New Street Birmingham

Masonic hall was the permanent Sunday meeting place of ecclesia from 1884 to 1910, when it was replaced by Suffolk Street hall. Weekday meeting were held from 1900 in easy Row, and possibly before that date in Lincoln’s Inn. At the time of division among Christadelphians, which took place in 1884 over the question of the full or partial inspiration of the Bible the Masonic Hall, ecclesia adopted the liberal position. Until reconciliation in 1957 and its successor, Suffolk Street, Birmingham remained at the head of one of two distinct “confederations” of Birmingham ecclesia.


Christadelphians - Paradise Street Birmingham

Midland Institute began to be used for meetings by the Birmingham Central ecclesia in 1932, after the lease of Temple Street Birmingham Temperance Hall had run out. In 1957 members at Yardley, Kittts Green and Weoley Castle were conducting three missionary Sunday Schools.


Christadelphians - Suffolk Street Birmingham

Hall was a opened in 1910 y the Masonic Hall ecclesia as it’s new place or worship.


Christadelphians - Temple Row Birmingham

Athenaeum Hall was rented by the Christadelphians in 1866 and opened as a “Christadelphians synagogue”. In 1871 the Birmingham ecclesia transferred its meetings to the Temperance Hall, Temple Street Birmingham.


Christadelphians -Temple Street Birmingham

Temperance hall was used for meetings of the Birmingham ecclesia from 1871. The temperance hall ceased to be used for meetings n 1932 and was replaced by meetings at the Midland Institute, Paradise Street. Birmingham At the time of the split in 1884 The Temperance Hall ecclesia adopted the fundamentalist position. Until the reconciliation of 1957 it and its successor at the Midland Institute remained at the head of one of two distinct “confederations” of ecclesia in Birmingham.


Christian Chartist Church

The Birmingham Christian Chartist Church met in one of three chapels in Newhall Street Birmingham. This appears to have been occupied in 1839 by a Methodist association congregation. The church aimed at furthering “temperance” morality and knowledge, and as well political association, it’s members organised children’s schools and a sick club. Livery Street Birmingham was reopened by the Latter Day Saints


Christian Scientists - Broad Street Birmingham

Chapel formerly a Presbyterian place of worship, was acquired in 1929 by members of the Birmingham Second Church, which had been formed in 1924-5 out of the first church. It was said that the chapel became overcrowded by 1931 and in the following year the Birmingham Third Church, shortly afterwards accommodated at Steelhouse Lane, Birmingham received official recognition.


Christian Scientists - Newhall Hill Birmingham

Chapel formerly a Unitarian place of worship was bought in 1921 for the use of the Birmingham First Church. The first Church was founded in 1913 by the union of two earlier congregations, which met in Birmingham and Kings Norton respectively. The Birmingham group met in two rooms at Avebury House (registered 1901-10) and at Ruskin Building, Corporation Street Birmingham, (registered 1910-15). The Kings Norton group recognised by the Christian Science Board of Directors, Boston in 1908 met at the “Rookery” Kings Norton (registered in 1915). Newhall Hill, Birmingham chapel was closed in 12953, the congregation moving to Sandon Road Bearwood.


Christian Scientists - Steelhouse Lane Birmingham

Ebenezer Hall formerly a Congregational chapel, was registered in 1933 for he use of the Birmingham Third Church founded in 1931-2 by members of the Second Church, Broad Street, Birmingham. The hall was damaged by bombing in 1941 and in 1942 the congregation moved to Camp Hill chapel.


Church of Christ

The Church of Christ was a nationwide organisation very similar to the Baptist Church in the practise of adult baptism. The Record Repository is based at The Orchard Learning Resource Centre Westhill College Selly Oak Birmingham Access is available only by means of an advance appointment made in writing. 


Church of Christ - Anderton Street Birmingham

Chapel came into the possession of the churches of Christ in 1898. it was formerly a Baptist chapel. The church had previously met in Powell Street Birmingham. The chapel was sold in 1933, the place of meeting moved to Quinton. The building was subsequently used by Brethren ‘s meeting.


Church of Christ - Charles Henry Street Digbeth

Chapel was opened in 1864. The church founded in Bradford Street Digbeth in 1857, had met subsequently at Bond Street Hockley chapel and at the Oddfellows and Temperance Halls, Temple Street, Birmingham The chapel was closed in 1912 the congregation moving to Moseley Road.


Church of Christ - Cherry Street Birmingham

Meeting room was in use in 1858 and 1859. The church, the first Birmingham church connected wit the Churches of Christ appears to have been founded in 1857. In 1859 it moved to Bond Street Hockley.


Church of Christ - Powell Street Birmingham

Chapel was opened in 1886.The chapel appears to have closed in 1898, the church moving to Anderton Street Birmingham.


Congregationalists and Independents

In October 1972, the Congregational Church of England and Wales united with the Presbyterian Church of England to form the United Reformed Church. 


Congregationalists and Independents

The following lists detail deposited records of the Warwickshire Congregational Union aid the Association of Birmingham Congregational Churches and of Birmingham Congregational (later United Reformed) Churches. For records of Presbyterian (later United Reformed ) Churches see Presbyterian section below. For records of new United Reformed Churches established after 1972 see church list below. 


Congregationalists and Independents - Allison Street Birmingham

Mission room was opened by Carrs Lane Birmingham Town Mission in 1837. It was replaced after about six years by Bordesley Street Birmingham chapel.


Congregationalists and Independents - Bishopgate Street Birmingham

Chapel was registered for public worship in 1817.


Congregationalists and Independents -Bordesley Street Birmingham

Chapel originally used by the Primitive Methodists was rented by Carrs Lane Birmingham Town Mission from 1845, and bought in 1855. The church was formed in 1860,and in 1875 the congregation moved to Gooch Street Highgate retaining Bordesley Street Birmingham as a mission station until 1880 when it was sold to the Salvation Army.


Congregationalists and Independents -Carrs Lane Birmingham

Chapel the “mother chapel “ of Birmingham Congregationalism was founded in 1748 by a succession from the Unitarian Old Meeting. The first building on a site acquired in 1746 was used until 1801. It lay between Carrs Lane Birmingham and New Meeting Street Birmingham. In 1802 a second chapel was built. Although galleries were added in 1812 this proved too small for a growing congregation and in 1820 a third chapel was completed on an extended site.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptisms 1785 – 1862

Burial 1831 - 1859


Congregationalists and Independents -  Crescent Locks Scotland Street Birmingham

Boatmen’s chapel was erected in 1841, as a mission of Carrs Lane Birmingham to canal workers in 1851. It continued in use until 1872 when it was used briefly for a Welsh Congregational church before closing. Its work had been by then largely superseded by the Boatmen’s Bethel, Worcester Wharf.


Congregationalists and Independents -  Digbeth

Digbeth the Old Battery site opposite Rea Street ,was opened by Carrs Lane Birmingham in 1908 as a social and religious centre’ The institute was closed in 1954.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Marriages 1912 – 1958


Congregationalists and Independents -  Fazeley Street Birmingham

Chapel, a mission of Carrs Lane Birmingham was in use in 1892. A Sunday evening congregation Fazeley Street first appeared in a Birmingham Directory in 1885, when it was listed as a Church of England Mission Hall. The congregational mission was transferred to Moseley Street Highgate hall in 1897.


Congregationalists and Independents -  Livery Street Birmingham

Chapel was first used for worship by the Unitairians from 1791 to 1802. In 1818 the church moved into the new Ebernezer Chapel Steelhouse Lane Birmingham, but a congregation continued to use the old chapel, with interruptions until 1837, when the Legge Street congregation took it over. In 1840 Livery Street Birmingham may have been transformed for a time into a Chartist Church. In 1845 most of the church members appear to have moved into the newly built Highbury Chapel, Graham Street, and the Livery Street chapel was acquired and reopened by the Latter-day Saints. In 1847 it was said that the Livery Street and Newhall Street Birmingham congregation were united in a Baptist church at Zion Chapel Newhall Street Birmingham.


Congregationalists and Independents -  Oxford Street Digbeth

Chapel was described as an Independent chapel in 1795. it is known to have existed in 1789. It is probably identifiable with the chapel acquired by the Methodist New Connexion in 1811 and is known to have been built before 1800.


Congregationalists and Independents -  Sharp Street

Chapel an old warehouse was taken over by a body of “Calvinistic” Independents” in 1833


Congregationalists and Independents -Sherborne Street

Mission was opened for a congregation founded the previous year in Mill Street. The mission premises were used for Sunday schools, worship and weekday evening meetings and for “ British Workman” temperance coffeehouse. The mission was discontinued when the lease expired in 1902.


Congregationalists and Independents -  Steelhouse Lane Birmingham

Ebernezer Chapel was built by the church meeting at Livery Street Birmingham chapel and opened in 1818.It was closed in 1929 and the site sold. Ebernezer Chapel was responsible for the founding before 1834 of daughter chapels at Coleshill, Solihull, Knowle and Marston Green. From 1867 to 1872 members had charge of a subsidiary mission at Legge Street Aston.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptism 1838 – 1931


Elim Church - Graham Street/ Newhall Street Birmingham

Elim Tabernacle was in 1930 the first place of worship of the Elim Church in Birmingham. The building had previously been used as a Congregational chapel.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Marriage 1959 –1988


Friends - Bath Row Birmingham

Meeting room was the first permanent branch meeting founded by Bull Street, Birmingham members. It began in 1872 as a meeting held in a schoolroom in Bath Row, Birmingham. The meeting room was replaced in 1893 by a new hall at George Road.


Friends - Bristol Street

Board School was used for Christian Society Meetings from February 1877 when the headquarters of the society were transferred from Severn Street Birmingham. In 1895 the place of meeting was moved to Gooch Street Highgate hall.


Friends - Bull Street Birmingham

Meeting house, first built to replace Newhall Lane Birmingham in 1703.In 1856-57 it was replaced by a new meeting – house. It was closed in 1931 when the present meetinghouse was erected on the same site, opened in 1933. From 1703 to 1873 Bull Street, Birmingham was the sole Quaker meeting in Birmingham, and its history during this period has, therefore, been considered in the general article on nonconformity.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptism 1788 – 1876

Marriages 1693 –1820

Burials / graves 1660 - 1861


Friends - Cheapside Digbeth

“ Swan with Two Necks” a converted public house, in use in 1909 as an adult and social club.


Friends - Cross Street

Bible mission rooms were in use in 1871. The premises were of two dwelling houses thrown into one to provide a large meeting room on the first floor. The mission was closed in1891, the congregation uniting with a meeting at Severn Street, Birmingham.


Friends - Newhall Lane Birmingham

Meeting house was registered for worship in 1689. It was replaced by Bull Street Birmingham in 1703.


Friends - Rea Street Birmingham

“Coppersmith Arms” a converted public house, was opened as an adult school in 1902 and was in use as an Christian Society mission in 1908. The school, which was founded in 1877, had previously been held in a farmhouse.


Friends - Severn Street Birmingham

British school was in use in 1845, for the first Birmingham adult school, founded by Joseph Strurge. About 1852 and upper story was added to provide accommodation for a girls school, and shortly after 1870 three more meeting rooms were added. Religious meetings in connection with the classes began before 1864, although the Christian Society, whose headquarters were at the school until 1877, was not founded until 1873. The Christian Society was still meeting at the schools in 1908.


Friends - Staniforth Street Birmingham

Hall, opened in 1890. Adult school work began in Staniforth Street in 1883, in a large dilapidated schoolroom formerly connected with Bishop Ryder’s Church, and was also accommodated for a time at Dartmouth Street Board School. The premises were sold in 1946, the remaining attendees joining the Farm Street congregation.


Friends - Upper Priory Birmingham

Priory Rooms were built in 1861. They were opened primarily to accommodate the women’s adult school founded in 1848 at Ann Street school, and do not appear to have been customarily used for worship. From 1931 to 1933 the Bull Street congregation met in the rooms while their new meetinghouse was being built.


Hospitals - Birmingham Children’s Hospital Birmingham

Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptisms 1922 - 1986


Hospitals - Birmingham Maternity Hospital Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre Edgbaston

Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptisms 1970 – 1978

Marriages 1981 - 1983


Inter- Denominational and Un-denominational Missions

The City Mission was founded about 1838 with the object of sending Bible readers into the homes of the poor. The early work of the mission included the organising of a temperance society, a band of Hope, “ragged” school and cottage and open-air meetings. Services in tramp wards of the workhouses and in hospitals were also undertaken. The missioners pioneered the work of preaching to the deaf and dumb, which was later taken over by the Birmingham and Midland Adult Deaf and Dumb Association. In 1856 the mission turned its attention to the Birmingham cabmen, building a number of cabmen’s shelters with cooking and rest facilities. As many as ten were in existence at the time they were handed over to the corporation in 1904. From about 1910 the mission was inter-denominational in the sense that it’s workers maintained their connection with their separate churches. In 1850 another mission in Noel Road, Edgbaston. A second refuge in Tindal Street Balsall Heath, which was in 1886. In 1929 the mission was wound up and it’s endowments and assets transferred to the Birmingham Medical Mission, Floodgate Street, Birmingham.


Inter-Denominational and Un-denominational Missions

The Medical Mission first began work in Birmingham in 1875 when a dispensary was opened in Park Street, and moved in the following year, into premises in Barn Street off Fazely Street Birmingham. New premises, specially built for the mission, were opened in Floodgate Street Birmingham in 1879.There was also in 1892 a branch mission in Granville Street, Birmingham In 1899 the branch mission was in Ellis Street Birmingham, another was conducted in connexion with the Presbyterians church in Long Acre Aston. In 1938 part of the old premises was sold and a new branch opened in Kitts Green Road on the Lea Hall Estate Kitts Green. About this date the ‘parish’ of the mission was extended to permit work in any part of Birmingham, and after the Second World War it was decided to concentrate effort in the new Lea Hall and Glebe Farm Shard End estate. The remaining premises in Floodgate Street Deritend were consequently sold in 1945.


Inter-Denominational and Un-denominational Missions

The Railway Gospel Mission An interdenominational mission for evangelistic work among railwaymen, had two Birmingham meeting places in 1883 Bolton Road Sparkhill and Mill Lane Saltley. In 1892 a branch described as the Vauxhall mission occupied ‘Duddeston Hall’., which may be identifiable with Duddeston Gospel hall, Great Francis Street Duddeston, registered for public worship in 1916. Harvey’s memorial Hall in Bolton Road Sparkhill was registered in 1898. In a new mission hall in St Andrews Road Bordesley was opened for ‘evangelistic and temperance work among railwaymen. In 1929 a new branch of the mission was started at Tyseley in connection with which Acocks Green Embankment mission in Spring Road Acocks Green was registered in 1934. The St Andrews Road Hall passed into the hands of the Dr Crabbe memorial mission in 1948, and in 1957 the only Birmingham branch of the mission was Spring Road.


Inter-Denominational and Un-denominational Missions

The Seaman’s and Boatmen’s Friend Society an un-denominational body seeking to ‘promote’ the social, moral and religious welfare of seamen, canal boatmen and their families. First registered as a building in Birmingham for public worship in 1865. Similar work among the Birmingham canal workers, was started by the Congregationalists in 1841. In 1852 in addition to the Congregationalists mission there was a ‘boatmen’s chapel’ in Water Street Birmingham, the address in 1858 was Tindal Bridge. Around 1865 a Boatmen’s bethel was built on Worcester Wharf.. In 1913 the registered title of the building was changed to the Bridge Street Boatmen’s Hall. It was no longer open in 1957.


Islam

The Moslem community in Birmingham dates substantially from the 1930’s.


Jehovah’s Witnesses

(formerly Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society and International Bible Students Association)


Jehovah’s Witnesses - Corporation Street Birmingham

Meeting rooms, was registered for public worship from 1914 to 1925.


Jehovah’s Witnesses - Howard Street Birmingham

Tabernacle was registered for public worship from 1923 to 1954.


Jehovah’s Witnesses - Lincoln’s Inn Corporation Street Birmingham

Watch Tower Room was registered for public worship in 1910, by a group which moved 1912 to Upper Priory. Birmingham.


Jehovah’s Witnesses - Upper Priory Birmingham

Meeting room was registered for public worship in 1912.


Judism

Birmingham is the home of one of the oldest provincial Ashkenazi communities. There was certainly an organised Jewry in 1766, when ground was acquired in Granville Street Birmingham for a Jewish cemetery. Birmingham Jews in he 18th century appear to have been few and poor. In 1780 there was however a synagogue in the ‘Froggery’. The Jewry was apparently centred on Dudley Street, Birmingham. The Jewish community at the beginning of the 19th century comprised only a handful of families. During the first half of the century there was a rapid increase. The 19th century increase is clearly reflected in the enrolment figures at the Hebrew free school of London. In 1780 the earliest records of the congregation show that by 1826 Birmingham Jewry was closely organised and orthodox community. The congregation was then worshipping in its third synagogue, for the Froggery had been abandoned for premises in Hurst Street, Birmingham in 1791, and these in their turn replaced by a new synagogue in Severn Street, Birmingham dedicated in 1809. Apart from a brief interruption caused by damage suffered in the 1813 riots, Severn Street served until 1856 when a large new synagogue was opened in Blucher Street Singers Hill Birmingham to replace it. Three years before some worshipers from Severn Street had seceded and established a rival congregation in Wrottersley Street of which the Central Synagogue in Bristol Street is the direct decendent. Before the end of the century there was also in existence a ‘Beth Hamdrash’ in Holloway Head Birmingham (registered for public worship in1894 ) from which was founded in 1920 the new Synagogue in Hurst Street, Birmingham. Religious unity had suffered since 1900, in the proposal to erect a Reform synagogue in Hagley Road, affiliated to the West London Synagogue of British Jews. Although the reformers were reconciled to a compromise service in 1915 a later breach caused by a secession of Liberal Jews in 1935 was never healed and resulted in the founding of a separate congregation, affiliated to the London Liberal Synagogue, which first met at a synagogue in Wellington Passage, Birmingham and subsequently in Sheepcote Street, Birmingham. Against the arguments for a decline ought to be set, the reconstruction of Blucher Street synagogue in 1937, and the opening of new synagogue in Bristol Street 1928, Pershore Road 1948,and Park Road, Moseley 1954.There was also religious instruction at Shirley.


Judism - Blucher Street Birmingham

Singer Hill synagogue was completed in 1856 replacing Severn Street. Birmingham.


Judism - Bristol Street Birmingham

Central synagogue and ‘Talmund Torah’ was registered for public worship in 1928 replacing Wrottesley Street ‘Beth Hamdrash’.Itgv had previously been used as the primitive Methodist ‘Bristol Hall’.


Judism - Froggery

Synagogue was mentioned in 1780. it was replaced in 1791 by newly built synagogue in Hurst Street Birmingham.


Judism - Holloway Head Birmingham

Old ‘ Beth Hamedrash’ was registered for public worship in 1894. it was replaced in 1920 by the new synagogue Hurst Street Birmingham.


Judism - Hurst Street Birmingham

New synagogue was opened to replaced the Old Beth Hamedrash, Holloway Head in 1920 and remained in use until 1954, when it was closed at the same time as the opening of Park Road Moseley synagogue.


Judism - Severn Street Birmingham

Synagogue was opened in 1809 to replaced Hurst Street Birmingham. It was damaged by rioters in 1813,but was restored and reopened in 1817. In 1856 Severn Street was closed on the opening of the new synagogue in Blucher Street, and since that time the building has been in use as a Masonic Hall, and for a time as a Welsh Baptist chapel.


Judism - Sheepcote Street Birmingham

Synagogue was registered for public worship in 1938. it replaced the synagogue in Wellington Passage.


Judism - Wellington Passage  Birmingham

Synagogue was opened in 1935, and was used as the synagogue of a branch of the London Liberal synagogue, affiliated to the Jewish Religious Union.


Judism - Wrottesley Street  Birmingham

Synagogue was founded in 1853. In 1901 the meeting place was described, on registration as being in Ladywell Passage, Wrottesley Street. It was replaced in 1928 by Bristol Street Central Synagogue.


Labour Church - Birmingham

Labour Church in connection with the Labour Church Union, was founded in 1893, and from 1894 to 1897 occupied Bond Street chapel, formerly a Baptist and a Methodist place of worship. In 1897 the church moved to Oozells Street, Birmingham Board School and in the following to Bristol St, where it continued for some years The title of the body has changed in 1909 to Birmingham Socialists church. The church was dissolved shortly after the outbreak of the First World War. Another labour church existed at Stirchley at least from 1911 to 1913, and probably for a longer period. Through out the congregation’s history two tendencies existed among the members: agnosticism and an ill-defined Christian socialism. Tom Groom for many years secretary of the church, was a former member of the guild of St Matthew, the Anglican socialist order founded by Stewart Headlam. The Birmingham Church did not subscribe to the five article on which the national church was based, and required of it’s members only ‘adhesion’ to the moral and economic laws that may be adduced from the Fatherhood of God or the Brotherhood of Man. At the same time it adopted religious forms, holding regular Sunday evening services and publishing a hymnal in several editions. In 1899 J A Fallows formerly a minister of the Church of England, became secretary. J. A. Fallows was also secretary of the Socialist Centre, and there were other links with the political labour movement. In 1895 the Labour Church combined with the Birmingham Fabian Society to found the Socialist Lecture Committee, and in 1901, it took part in the formation of the Birmingham Labour Representation Council. In 1909 the church was described by its committee as ‘the common meeting ground of men and women representing all sections of the socialist movement’. A subsidiary youth organisation, the ‘Cinderella Club’ was said to have been founded by Robert Blatchford in 1863, and as ‘Clarion Cinderella Club’ it survived the Labour Church. It was explicitly non-political and devoted itself to treats and excursions for poor children, and similar social and charitable work. For several years the club conducted a holiday cottage for cripple children outside Birmingham. The first Clarion Cycling Club was formed at a meeting of the Birmingham church in 1894.


Lady Huntingdon’s Connexion -  Bartholomew Street Birmingham

Cave of Adullam was completed in 1791. The congregation was attributed to lady Huntingdon’s Connexion by Hutton in 1795, but was described simply as ‘Calvanist' in 1830, and as Independent Calvinist’ in the 1851 Census return, so its 19th century affiliation is not clear. In 1849 the chapel was sold to the L.N.W.R (railways), and pulled down, the congregation moving to Salem Chapel, Peck Lane Birmingham a new building completed in 1851. In 1852 the congregation moved again to a chapel in Frederick Street Hockley, where it shortly afterwards adopted adult baptism, and continued as a Strict Baptist Church.


Lady Huntingdon’s Connexion -  Cregoe Street Five Ways

Morton Chapel in No 11 Court was registered for public worship in 1869, and continued to appear in directories until 1880.


Lady Huntingdon’s Connexion - King Street Birmingham

Chapel, a former theatre, was registered for public worship in 1786. It continued in use until 1842 when, the lease expiring, the congregation moved to Peck Lane Birmingham.


Lady Huntingdon’s Connexion -  Paradise Street Birmingham

Chapel is said to have been the first chapel of Lady Huntingdon’s Connexion in Birmingham and was opened shortly after 1774. it seems likely that it became a Congregational chapel after the opening of King Street Birmingham in 1786.


Lady Huntingdon’s Connexion - Peck Lane Birmingham

Chapel, built in 1842 for the King Street congregation, and dismantled in 1850 by the L.N.W.R. (railways) in the process of building New Street Railway Station, Birmingham. The congregation moved to temporary accommodation at the Oddfellows Hall in 1851. A new chapel was registered in Gooch Street Highgate in 1851.


Latter-day Saints (Mormons) - Booth  Street Birmingham

Chapel was opened in 1913 for a congregation previously worshipping in Wrentham Road Hockley. From 1929 to 1932 the headquarters of the Latter-day Saints British Mission was established at No 23 Booth Street. Branch churches existed at Saltley from 1914 to 1926 and at Sparkbrook from 1909 to 1913 and from 1926 to 1945 meeting in hired premises.


Latter-day Saints (Mormons) - Cambridge Street Birmingham

Chapel was in use from 1852 to 1858.


Latter-day Saints (Mormons) - Livery  Street Birmingham

Chapel, formerly a Congregational chapel was occupied by the Latter-day Saints from 1845 to 1855.


Latter-day Saints (Mormons) - Oxford  Street Birmingham

Chapel formerly used by the Methodist new Connexion was occupied by the Latter-day Saints from 1865 to 1868.


Latter-day Saints (Mormons) - Thorpe  Street Birmingham

Chapel was in use from 1855 to 1858.


Liberal Catholics - Corporation Street  Birmingham

Meeting-room in Walmer Buildings, was registered for public worship in 1925.


Methodists - Balloon Street

Friendly Tabernacle said to have been the first chapel of the Primitive Methodists in Birmingham was opened in 1826. Some time before 1831 the church separated from the Primitive Methodist Connexion, which did not rejoin until after 1846.The chapel was open in 1849, but appears to have been closed before the 1851 religious census.


Methodists - Bank Alley Dale End

Chapel was registered for public worship in 1799.


Methodists - Bath Street Birmingham

Chapel was built by the Wesleyan Association in 1839, and claimed in 1851. It ceased to appear in the directories after 1884.


Methodists - Bell Barn Road Five Ways

Chapel a converted building was opened by the Wesleyans in 1834 and was used by them until 1853, when the congregation moved to Bristol Road, Birmingham, and the chapel was sold to the Welsh Baptists.

Birmingham Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department

Marriages 1841 - 1853


Methodists - Bond Street Birmingham

Chapel, formerly a Baptist place of worship, was acquired by the United Methodist Free Church in 1886, and continued in use until 1890. It was subsequently leased to the labour Church.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptisms. 1750-1837

Burials 1794-1834


Methodists - Bradford Street  Birmingham

Chapel was opened by John Wesley in 1786. The chapel was closed in 1936 and sold in 1938. members of Bradford Street, Birmingham helped to found the churches at Coventry Road and Warwick Road, Sparkhill.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptism 1829 - 1936

Marriages 1895 - 1934


Methodists - Bristol Road Birmingham

Chapel was built by the Wesleyans in 1834.The chapel was destroyed by bombing in 1940.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptism 1841 – 1941

Marriage 1877 -1940


Methodists - Bristol Street Birmingham

Bristol Hall was built by the Primitive Methodists in 1899 to replace Gooch Street. It comprised of a lecture hall, a mission hall, five classrooms and other rooms. It was closed in 1928 and was sold ‘ owing to the removal of the usual congregations and the large increase of the Jewish population in the immediate neighbourhood. The congregation moved to Balfour Street Balsall Heath chapel, and the building subsequently used as a synagogue.


Methodists - Buck Street Birmingham

Sea horse Hall, a former publics house and concert hall, was acquired in 1893 by a Wesleyan mission begun, the previous year in Great Lister Street, in connexion with the Birmingham Central Mission. It was converted for missionary and social reclamation work.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptism 1894 - 1940


Methodists - Cherry Street  Birmingham

Chapel the first chapel built for the Wesleyans in Birmingham, was opened by John Wesley in 1782. The chapel was demolished when Central Hall, Corporation Street was constructed in 1887.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptism 1802 - 1886


Methodists - Constitution Hill Birmingham

Wesleyan Chapel, built by thee Wesleyans in 1828.The congregation is said to have begun as a Sunday school in a former Congregationalists schoolroom at Livery Street, Birmingham in 1818. The chapel was closed and sold in 1918.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptism 1829 –1917

Marriage 1869 - 1917


Methodists - Corporation Street  Birmingham

Central hall was built in 1887, in part to replace Cherry Street, Birmingham chapel. The first building was soon found to be inadequate for an expanding congregation, and in 1903 was replaced by a larger hall. The old hall known as the ‘Kings Hall’ was leased for secular purposes and in 1908 was a cinema. The new Central building remains one of the impressive of its period in Birmingham.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptism 1887 - 1953


Methodists - Hatchett Street  Birmingham

Chapel appears as a Wesleyan place of worship from 1850 to 1890.


Methodists - Hatchett Street  Birmingham

Havergal House was registered for public worship in 1940, on the closing of the nearby chapel at Newtown Row, Birmingham Havergal House was opened bout 1892 as a girls club in connexion with the Birmingham Wesleyan Central Mission.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptism 1940 – 1964

Marriages 1945 - 1958


Methodists - Hill Street Birmingham

Meeting room was registered for public worship by the Primitives Methodists in 1845


Methodists - Holiday Street  Birmingham

Mission hall, was opened by the Wesleyans in 1875. The premises were sold in 1955.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptism 1931 - 1946


Methodists - Ickneild Street

East Summer Hill Chapel, was built by the Wesleyans in 1838. by 1868 it had been taken over by the Primitive Methodist chapel until 1882.


Methodists - Inge Street Birmingham

St John’s Chapel was opened by the Primitive Methodists in 1822. It appears to have been closed before 1856, and in 1868 the site was occupied by St Martins parochial school. From 1875 to 1888 or 1889 a Wesleyan chapel, also called St John’s was opened on the same site.


Methodists - Lower King Edward’s Road

Chapel appears in the Birmingham directories from 1860 to 1876. From 1868 it was described as a Wesleyan Sunday school.


Methodists - Mary Street

Chapel, was bought by the Wesleyans in 1908. Location of this chapel is uncertain


Methodists - Moor Street Birmingham

Chapel, a converted theatre, was opened by the Wesleyans in 1764 in a place in Steelhouse Lane, and as replaced in 1782 by the new chapel in Cherry Street.


Methodists - Moseley Street Birmingham

Chapel appears to have been built by the Wesleyans Reformers in the early 1850’s. But was first registered for public worship by the Methodists New Connexion in 1861.In 1897 the premises were sold to the Congregationalists. The church was united with that worshipping at Ombersley Road Balsall Heath.


Methodists - New John Street West Birmingham

Primitive Methodists chapel was opened in 1849, The chapel ceased to be registered for public worship in 1895.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptism 1864 - 1896


Methodists - New John Street West Birmingham

Wesleyan chapel was bought by the Wesleyans about 1865. The chapel appears to have been closed before 1908.


Methodists - Norman Street

Preaching Room was registered for public worship by the Wesleyans from 1872 to 1899.


Methodists - Oxford Street  Birmingham

Chapel was opened by the Methodist New Connexion in 1811, and was the Connexion’s first Birmingham chapel. It appears to have previously served as a congregational chapel. From 1865 to 1868 the chapel was in the hands of the Latter Day Saints. It was then in 1871, registered as a place of worship by a body of Temperance Methodists, but is entered in the directories from 1873 as a Weselyan Reform Chapel. In 1878 it was being used by the Welsh Wesleyans who appear to have abandoned it before 1892. The last official section of the Birmingham Directory occurs in 1884.


Methodists - Spring Hill Birmingham

Chapel was registered for public worship by the Primitive Methodists in 1909 and appears to have replaced Edward Street. It closed in 1921 or 1922, many of the congregation migrating to New Spring Street Winson Green chapel.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptism 1896 - 1919


Methodists - Steelhouse Lane  Birmingham

Chapel, apparently the first Methodist meeting- house in Birmingham was in use in 1751. Services were held in an outhouse behind a private house on the corner of Whittall Street, Birmingham and Steelhouse Lane, Birmingham belonging to a Mr Walker. The congregation moved in 1764 to Moor Street, Birmingham.


Other Churches and Missions - Broad  Street

Bible Hall Birmingham was registered for public worship in 1904., and registered by the Birmingham and Midland Adult Deaf and Dumb Association in 1909.


Other Churches and Missions -  Corporation Street Birmingham

County Chambers Esoteric Classrooms were registered for public worship in 1915.


Other Churches and Missions -  Corporation Street Birmingham

Meeting room at No. 266 was registered for public worship from 1928 to 1938by a body of ‘Bible Students’ who subsequently moved to Steelhouse Lane.


Other Churches and Missions - Great  Brook Street Birmingham

Open air Mission meetings rooms were registered for public worship from 1934 to 1954. The mission had previously from 1931, met in rooms in Coleshill Street Birmingham.


Other Churches and Missions -  Islington Row / Wheeley’s Lane Five  Ways

Meeting room was registered for public worship in 1934.


Other Churches and Missions -  Steelhouse Lane Glovers Building

Bible Students Birmingham meeting room was registered for public worship in 1938.


Other Churches and Missions - Upper Priory Birmingham

Meeting room was registered for public worship from 1932 to 1946.


Other Churches and Missions - Wrottesley Street Protestant Chapel Birmingham

Is in connection with he ‘Protestant evangelical mission and electoral union’ of London, was purchased and opened by the anti-catholic preacher in 1867.


Presbyterian Meeting Houses and Unitarian and Free Christian Churches  - Bristol Street Birmingham

Old Meeting Church was opened in 1885, and replaced by the Old Meeting Street Birmingham chapel. Under the guidance of Lloyd Thomas (minister 1912 – 1932 ) Bristol Street severed organisational connexion with the Unitarian Free Churches in 1928, and the chapel became the meeting-place of a ‘Society of Free Catholics’ founded by Thomas. From 1931 the minister G.O.Griffiths was a Baptist. The chapel was destroyed by bombing in 1940, but services continued to be held in the attached school until 1949.


Birmingham Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department

Various records 1700’s onwards


Presbyterian Meeting Houses and  Unitarian and Free Christian  Churches - Broad Street Birmingham

Church of the Messiah was completed in 1862, and replaced the new meeting Chapel in Moor Street, Birmingham.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptism 1747 –1931

Marriage 1837 –1926

Burials 1849 –1860 (trustees only)


Presbyterian Meeting Houses and  Unitarian and Free Christian  Churches - Edward Street  Birmingham

Church of the Saviour was opened by George Dawson, former pastor of Mount Zion Baptist chapel Graham Street Birmingham in 1847. It was conducted as an independent Unitarian chapel. The chapel was closed at the end of 1895 and was occupied by the Primitive Methodists until 1909.it was later used as a variety theatre and then became the Lyric Cinema, closing in 1960.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptism 1860 – 1895

Marriages 1848 - 1894


Presbyterian Meeting Houses and  Unitarian and Free Christian  Churches - Hurst Street Birmingham

Chapel was built in 1844 for the Birmingham Domestic Mission. The mission had previously used Thorp Street chapel. The chapel was closed in 1921 when he congregation united with that of Waverly Road.


Presbyterian Meeting Houses and  Unitarian and Free Christian  Churches - Little Cannon Street  Birmingham

Meeting house was built in 1809 by the congregation of Paradise Street Birmingham chapel formerly Congregational and was closed in 1814.


Presbyterian Meeting Houses and  Unitarian and Free Christian  Churches - Livery Street Birmingham

Union Meeting, a former circus and riding school was registered for religious worship by the lessee William Russell, in 1791. It was used by the congregations of the Old and New Meetings after the destruction of their chapels in the July riots. In 1795 part of the congregation left, but the chapel continued as a Unitarian place of worship until the reopening of the New Meeting in 1802, when it was occupied by a body of Congregationalists seceding from Carrs Lane Birmingham.


Presbyterian Meeting Houses and  Unitarian and Free Christian  Churches - Moor Street Birmingham

Lower Meeting congregation was in existence by 1690. Their first meetinghouse apparently stood in a tan-yard in Deritend, which suffered some damage in the riots of 1715. In 1727 a fresh site in Moor Street was bought on which the New Meeting House was opened in 1732.This was used until it was gutted by fire in the ‘church and king’ riots of 1791. A third chapel was opened in 1802. In 1861 the chapel was sold to the Roman Catholics, and the congregation moved to a new building in Broad Street. As St Michaels Roman Catholic church the Moor Street building of 1802 survives as the least altered of Birmingham’s early dissenting chapels. In 1848 Lawrence Street chapel was acquired for the domestic mission and Newhall Hill, Birmingham opened in 1840, may also be regarded as a daughter chapel of the New Meeting.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptism 1690 – 1926 (various dates)


Presbyterian Meeting Houses and  Unitarian and Free Christian  Churches - Newhall Hill Birmingham

Chapel was built in 1840.The congregation was founded in 1834 by a secession of members of the Teachers’ Society of the New Meeting, who met first in a Unitarian chapel in Cambridge Street Birmingham. In 1911 the chapel was closed through lack of support. A part of the congregation moved to a room in Villa Road, which was registered for public worship, until it was replaced by Gibson Road Handsworth chapel in 1915. Newhall Hill, Birmingham was subsequently used as a munitions factory in the First World War and was reopened as a church by the Christian Scientists in 1922 it was closed in 1953. In 1961 the building was occupied by the Birmingham City Transport.


Presbyterian Meeting Houses and  Unitarian and Free Christian  Churches - Old Meeting House Street  Birmingham ( formerly Phillip Street )

Old Meeting was registered as a dissenter’s meetinghouse in 1689. It was severely damaged in the riots of 1715 and burned down in those of 1791. A new brick chapel was built and opened in 1795. In connection with clearances for the building of the New Street station the Old Meeting was sold to the L.N.W.R. ( railway company ) in 1881, most of the proceeds from the sale were appropriated to the building of a new chapel for the congregation in Bristol Street Birmingham.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Various records 1689 - 1881


Presbyterian Meeting Houses and  Unitarian and Free Christian  Churches - Thorp Street Birmingham

Chapel was opened in 1839 and was used from 1840 to 1844 by the Birmingham Unitarian Domestic Mission. It appears subsequently to have been opened by the Latter Day Saints.


Presbyterians - Broad Street  Birmingham

Chapel was opened in 1834 for a congregation previously worshiping in Newhall Street Birmingham. In 1924 it began to be used by the Christian Scientists who subsequently bought the building. The church moved in 1926 to Oozells Street North, Birmingham and became known as the Guildhouse Church.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptism 1827 – 1830 & 1906 - 1969

Marriage 1838 – 1945

Burial 1849 –1860 (trustees only)


Presbyterians

In October 1972, the Congregationa1 Church of England and Wales united with the Presbyterian Church of England to form the United Reformed Church. 


Presbyterians - Newhall Street  Birmingham

Chapel was built about 1825. It was used by the Presbyterian until 1834, and subsequently by the Catholic Apostolic Church the Presbyterians congregation moving to Broad Street, Birmingham.


Presbyterians - Newhall Street  Birmingham ( properly Graham Street )

Mount Zion Chapel was opened in 1824 and was used by the Presbyterians for about two years before their migration to a smaller chapel in Newhall Street, Birmingham


Presbyterians - Oozells Street North  Birmingham

Guildhouse Church was opened in 1926 to replace Broad Street .


Salvation Army - Barford Street  Digbeth

Hall was registered for public worship by the ‘Slum Corps’ in 1901, and ceased to be registered in 1952.


Salvation Army - Bordesley Street  Birmingham

Chapel was bought from Carrs Lane Birmingham Congregational Town Mission about 1880.


Salvation Army - Coleman Street

Hall was registered for public worship in 1927.


Salvation Army - Corporation Street  Birmingham

Citadel was in use in 1892.


Salvation Army - Granville Street  Birmingham

Barracks were registered for public worship from 1895 to 1903.


Salvation Army - James Watt Street  Birmingham

Sunday school rooms were registered for public worship in 1931.


Salvation Army - Newton Street  Birmingham

Young people’s hall was registered for public worship from 19020 to 1923.


Salvation Army - Pope Street

Hall was registered for public worship from 1924 to 1938.


Salvation Army - Theodore Street

St Edward’s Mission Hall was registered for public worship in 1929.


Seventh Day Adventists - Broad Street  Birmingham

Hall was registered for public worship from 1944 to 1952.


Seventh Day Adventists - New Street  Birmingham

Meeting-room of the Society of Artists was registered for public worship in 1942, and was used for a short period.


Spiritualists - Camden Street  Birmingham

Board School was in use for meetings in 1892.


Spiritualists - Corporation Street  Birmingham

Church was in existence in 1903, when two rooms in County Chambers were registered for public worship. In 1928 the registration was transferred to No. 258 and in 1925 to No. 258 Corporation Street, which in 1954 was the meeting place of the ‘Birmingham Spiritualists’ Church..


Spiritualists - Great Colmore Street  Five Ways

Church was registered for public worship from 1933 to 1952.


Spiritualists - Moor Street St John’s  Church Birmingham

Was registered for public worship by the Christian Spiritualists from 1934 to 1952.


Spiritualists - Oozells Street  Birmingham

Board School was in use for meetings in 1892.


Spiritualists - Pershore Street St John’s  Church Birmingham

In rooms was registered for public worship in 1925.


Spiritualists - Summer Row  Birmingham

Central Spiritualist Church at No. 22 was registered for public worship by the Christian Spiritualists in 1928.


Swedenborgians (new Jerusalem Church) - New Church Street  Birmingham

Chapel was in use in 1830. In 1858 the site was occupied by the New Jerusalem British School. It seems possible that New Church Street was used as a temporary accommodation pending the opening of Summer Lane Birmingham.


Swedenborgians (new Jerusalem  Church) - Newhall Street Birmingham

Chapel (I) was built in 1791 and has been claimed as he first chapel ever built for the new Church. It was sold before 1794 to pay debts of the owner, and was subsequently reopened as a Baptist chapel. The congregation had previously met first in a room in Great Charles Street, Birmingham opened in 1789, and then in Needless Alley, Birmingham. On the closing of their chapel they moved to another building in the same street.


Swedenborgians (new Jerusalem  Church) - Newhall Street Birmingham

Chapel (II) was opened in 1794 and remained in use until 1830.


Swedenborgians (new Jerusalem  Church) - Paradise Street Birmingham

Chapel vacant after removal of a Unitarian congregation in 1809, was occupied in that year by a succeeding congregation of Swendenborgians, later reunited with the mother church in Newhall Street, Birmingham.


Unitarians

See Presbyterians meetinghouses and Unitarian and Free Christian Churches,


Welsh Presbyterians ( Welsh  Calvinistic Methodists) - Granville  Street Birmingham (formerly Wood  Street )

Re-housed both chapels at the foot of Bath Row, Birmingham was erected in 1849. The chapel was replaced about 1898 by a new building in Suffolk Street, Birmingham.


Welsh Presbyterians ( Welsh  Calvinistic Methodists) - Peck Lane  Birmingham

Chapel, next to lady Huntingdon’s Connexion chapel, was in use in 1842. The congregation, evicted by railway extensions built a new chapel in Wood Street ( Granville Street, Birmingham ) in 1849.


Welsh Presbyterians ( Welsh  Calvinistic Methodists) - Suffolk Street  Birmingham

Chapel registered for public worship in 1898, was built to replace Granville Street, Birmingham


Roman Catholic


St Michael 1846 Moor Street / Park  Street (O.S. GR. SP 0686)

St Nicholas, Park Street Birmingham was said in 1854 to have been established in 1847. For a few years before 1861 the second floor of a building in Well Lane served as St Nicholas’s Chapel, with boys and girls school underneath. This chapel was replaced in 1862 by the former New Meeting Chapel. In May 1862, a Unitarian meetinghouse was purchased, and consecrated for use as a Catholic church by Bishop Morris, who pontificated at the High Mass and preached, and was subsequently dedicated to St Michael. Externally the building still retains the character of the simple classical meetinghouse of 1802. After the Second World War a Polish chaplain was established at St Michael’s with a Polish Club and special masses for Poles.


St Anne 1849 Bradford Street /  Alcester Street (O.S. GR SP 0786)

The mission was founded by the Oratorians in 1849. After they had moved to Edgbaston in 1852 they served the Alcester Street Birmingham mission for a short while. A new church was opened in 1884 (consecrated 1936) and the old one which had originally been a distillery, was then used as a school. Since 1938 the mission has been conducted by the Oblates of Mary Immaculate. St John Balsall Heath was served from here from 1860 to 1903.


St Chad's Cathedral 1808 Bath Street /  St Chad's Queensway (O.S. GR  SP0787)

The mission was established in 1806 when a room in Water Street Birmingham was opened as a chapel . A new chapel, apparently at first called St Austin’s was opened in Shadewell Street in 1808. The chapel was then demolished in 1839 and a new school was thenceforward used as a chapel until the cathedral was opened in 1841. The cathedral was restored in 1904. St Edward’s Chapel with its adjoining baptistery art the northwest corner of the church is an addition of 1933. By 1937 mass was also being celebrated in Brearley Street Lozells by priests from the Cathedral.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptisms 1807 - 1919

Conditional baptisms 1872 -1940 1876, 1886 – 1922

Index of baptisms 1835 -1927

Marriages 1807 –1942

Deaths 1807 – 1847

Crypt burials 1839 –1946.

A miscellaneous first communicant, confirmations, converts, deaths. 1843 - 1850


BMSGH Registers CD Rom CM 087 - Baptisms, marriages, burials 1807 - 1837

Fiche - M087 - Baptisms, marriages, burials 1807-1837

Warwick Record Office - BMSGH Transcript

Transcripts baptisms, marriages, burials 1807-1837


St Catherine of Sienna - 1858 Horse  Fair / Bristol Street (O.S. GR SP0686)

The mission was established in 1868. A room over a stable in Bristol Street Birmingham was used as a chapel for a few months and after 1869 the upper room of the school in Windmill Street Birmingham was used, the nave and aisles of the permanent church were opened in 1875


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptisms 1869 – 1908

Conditional baptisms 1872 - 1903


St Peter 1786 Broad Street / St Peter’s  Place (O.S. GR SP0586 approx.)

The chapel was built in 1786. It was enlarged in 1802 and 1825, thoroughly repaired in 1871, and consecrated in 1933. It was served by Franciscans from Baddesley Clinton (Warwickshire) until 1824, when it became a secular mission. In 1859 mass was said in St Patrick’s School by priests from St Peter’s. The original chapel, was the oldest surviving Roman Catholic place of worship in the city. Closed 1969 and demolished soon afterwards.


Registers at Birmingham Central Library – Archives department Baptisms 1657 – 1918

Baptisms children sent to St Chads from St Peter’s Jun 1841 – Jan 1843

Conditional baptisms 1878 - 1879

Index of baptisms 1757 – 1968

Marriages 1657 –1927

Reconciliation’s 1658 –1765

Deaths 1657 – 1792

Benefactors 1687

Confirmations 1841

Warwick R O – Phillimore transcript. Baptisms, marriages, burials 1658 -1840 Baptisms 1657 - 1824